Friday, May 25, 2018

General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) Takes Effect

The EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) takes effect today. As a result, you may be served notices when you use certain websites today, including Fannie's Room, regarding cookies used and data collected, in compliance with European Union laws.

In case you are not automatically served those notices, Google's disclosures can be found here: Google Privacy Policy and How Google Uses Information from Sites or Apps That Use Our Services. And Disqus' disclosures can be found here: Update on Privacy and GDPR Compliance.

This blog is hosted on Google/Blogger and has a third-party commenting system provided by Disqus. Fannie's Room is a strictly non-commercial blog and I do not sell or knowingly share user information with other third parties.

The Commenting and Privacy Policy for Fannie's Room can be found here.

Ocean Friday

Hi y'all, given the political times in which we've found ourselves, I'm looking forward to Ocean's 8 as a top pop culture event of 2018. 

The entire cast looks amazing, but of course I'm particularly excited about seeing Cate Blanchett and Sarah Paulson on screen again.

.

What are you reading, watching, playing, doing, and/or looking forward to?

Wednesday, May 23, 2018

Recap: Supergirl 3.10 "Legion of Super Heroes"

Last we saw Supergirl, she had just gotten her ass kicked by Reign.

So, now the DEO has her in a medically-induced coma while she heals. In her own mind, she's also "trapped" in her apartment building and once she figures out how to leave, she will emerge from the coma. A new character, Brainy, visits Supergirl in her mind and tries to help her. Brainy is a really smart cyborg who I would describe as looking like a tall Smurf/Oompa Loompa hybrid.


Meanwhile, Reign is still on the loose. And, she has declared war on.... criminals.

Wait what? Isn't that sort of what Supergirl and the DEO do?

I guess Reign's type of vigilantism is bad because she takes it too far, but it will be interesting to see ow the show explores what "taking it too far entails," especially in the context of how, and to what extent, Reign's vigilantism might differ from the DEO and Supergirl's. When discussing Reign, Alex notes that Reign hasn't just declared war on criminals, she has declared war on "the entire justice system." Yet, doesn't the DEO lock up some aliens without due process? Haven't they killed before, as well? Didn't Alex kill Astra?


At the DEO, Mon-El, Imra, and Brainy vaguely allude to the fact that they came to Earth on some sort of mission. They note that the Earth experiences a catastrophic event in the future in which all of our history and culture are wiped out. Hilariously, Imra says that therefore when Mon-El arrived, he taught them "everything" they know, including Aristotle, Shakespeare, and Bon Jovi. LOLOLOL.

Sure. I guess we're supposed to just believe that this guy who spent approximately 2 seconds on Earth, much of it being a fuck-up, taught these brilliant future folks the classics from Earth's. Puh-lease. The Mon-El storyline is starting to get a tad Avatar-ish for my taste (ie, "white guy goes native and becomes a great leader").

An actual funny moment occurs later when J'onn is forced to shape-shift to pretend to be Kara again, tis time in order to fool Lena, who believes Kara is sick at home with a cold. During this interaction, Lena tells J'onn-Kara that she and James kissed and J'onn-Kara finds the entire conversation completely awkward. LOL.


While Supergirl is in a coma, the DEO tries to entrap Reign. They bait her by pretending to rob a bank and, when she shows up, they throw some kryptonite at her. Yet, she's resistant to it and she gets away. She then goes to a prison and starts attacking the prisoners.

Mon-El, Imra, and Brainy join the DEO in going after her and, as Brainy flies the spaceship, I like that the controls are a throwback to Flight of the Navigator. Hmm, must have been another relic of pop culture that Mon-El taught him.


Back in her coma, Supergirl sees her Kara Danvers glasses/disguise and decides to come out of the coma. She flies in and helps fight Reign, but Reign gets away. But, at least Supergirl is back to normal again.

In conclusion, James and Lena kiss again, and I just can't.

Deep Thought of the Week: I guess Mon-El, Imra, and Brainy are part of a "Legion of Super Heroes"? Like, they even have matching costumes and glow rings. Perhaps this is supposed to impress me, but it doesn't. I don't mind a few rag-tag minor heroes she might have as allies or friends, akin to Oliver Queen's various gangs. I'll keep an open mind about where this "Legion" plotline is going, because to be fair I don't know that yet. But, the show is called Supergirl. I become less and less comfortable with plotlines that look like they're using a show that centers a woman to set up a male character for his own show one day.


Note: CW/Supergirl Executive Producer Andrew Kreisberg has been fired after a sexual harassment investigation. 

Friday, May 18, 2018

Umbrella Friday

I admit, watching lip sync battles is one of my distracting pleasures in life.

Now, I can't say I've ever had a particular interest in Tom Holland, but damn, he looks good in drag and has some impressive dance moves to boot.

In the clip below, the best part begins around minute 2:15, but before that, Zendaya also does a good Bruno Mars impression. And yes, I'm an old, so I had to look up who Zendaya was.


Thursday, May 17, 2018

The Precedent of Donald Trump's Rigged Election

Yesterday, The New York Times ran an article about the FBI's investigation of the Trump campaign's ties to Russia, codenamed Crossfire Hurricane.

It's worth a read, but what's striking to me is just how destructive Donald's pre-election claims about Clinton purportedly "rigging the election" were and continue to be, particularly to our democracy.

The piece discusses the disparate treatment of the FBI's investigation into Hillary Clinton's email server, in which James Comey announced the reopening of the case immediately prior to the 2016 election, compared to the FBI's silence over the fact that multiple Trump contacts were under investigation for ties to Russia at the time:
"[U]nderpinning both cases was one political calculation: that Mrs. Clinton would win and Mr. Trump would lose. Agents feared being seen as withholding information or going too easy on her. And they worried that any overt actions against Mr. Trump’s campaign would only reinforce his claims that the election was being rigged against him."
Donald Trump played the FBI, which so overreacted to Trump's claim that the system was rigged against him that they took action that had the effect of rigging the 2016 election for him.

Consider:
"Mr. Comey has said he regrets his decision to chastise Mrs. Clinton as “extremely careless,” even as he announced that she should not be charged. But he stands by his decision to alert Congress, days before the election, that the F.B.I. was reopening the Clinton inquiry.

The result, though, is that Mr. Comey broke with both policy and tradition in Mrs. Clinton’s case, but hewed closely to the rules for Mr. Trump."
Chastise the qualified woman, play by the rules for the male authoritarian incompetent. Sounds about right.

I'll also add that, quite frankly, Trump largely played the political press who continually let him make a rather weighty claim about the legitimacy of our electoral process without challenging him on it much or demanding that he back it up. The press also did this, and continues to do so, with respect to the "rigging" claim of the Bernie Sanders camp, a claim which will likely reoccur in 2020 if Bernie runs in the Democratic primary and, in particular, if he loses again.

This is now standard operating procedure for our presidential elections. Candidates claim that the election is rigged against them even if it's not, and sometimes, but only sometimes, it's actually true. Like a man expressing fantasies of locking up his political opponent, the Overton window has shifted so much that it is no longer all that newsworthy for a candidate to fictitiously claim that an opponent has rigged an election and, in the process, undermine the electoral process itself and any result that he finds unfavorable.